HD SPECTACLE LENSES

Do you have 20/20 vision when you wear your glasses but still feel dissatisfied with how you see? You might benefit from high-definition lenses.

Sometimes, higher-order aberrations can affect your vision, even if your prescription eyeglasses fully correct your nearsightedness, farsightedness and/or astigmatism. These aberrations may be due to the optical characteristics of your eyes or can be caused by the optical limitations of conventional eyeglass lenses. But there's good news! Recent advances in lens manufacturing have made possible new high-definition eyeglass lenses that correct these aberrations, potentially giving you sharper vision than you've ever had before with eyeglasses. These lenses are designed to provide sharper vision in all lighting conditions and reduce glare for nighttime driving and other night vision tasks.

Many brands of high-definition eyeglass lenses currently are available, including high-definition versions of high-index lenses and progressive lenses.

Free-Form Lenses

The most popular type of high-definition eyeglass lenses are called free-form lenses. The term "free-form" refers to an advanced manufacturing process that reduces higher-order aberrations such as spherical aberration that occur in eyeglass lenses created with traditional eyeglass lens manufacturing tools and processes.

High-Definition lenses are designed to provide sharper vision in all conditions and reduce glare for nighttime driving.

With free-form lenses (also called digital high-definition lenses), the fabrication of the lenses from wearer's eyeglass prescription is optimized with computer-controlled surfacing equipment that is much more precise than conventional tools.

In fact, free-form technology can surface lenses in power increments of 0.01 diopter (D), compared with 0.125 to 0.25 D increments of conventional eyeglass lens tooling. The fabrication of some digital, free-form lenses also takes into account how the lenses are positioned in front of the wearer's eyes when in the eyeglass frame, to provide the most accurate lens power and the sharpest vision possible.

Other factors that may be considered in the lens customization process include the angle between the eye and the back surface of the lens in different gaze positions (for example, when the wearer is looking off to the side rather than straight through the center of the lens), the frame size and the position of the wearer's pupil within the frame outline.

Wave-front Lenses

Some lens manufacturers have introduced an even more customized type of high-definition eyeglass lenses called wave-front lenses.

Wave-front lenses are created with the help of the same sophisticated technology used to measure the optics of the eye prior to custom, wave-front-guided LASIK eye surgery: A computerized instrument projects uniform light waves into the eye, which reflect off the retina, and the returning "wave-front" of light is analyzed to evaluate all optical imperfections — not just refractive errors, but higher-order aberrations as well.

MR-8 and Trivex Lenses

MR-8 lenses and Trivex lenses are lighter and more impact-resistant than regular plastic lenses. They're great for safety glasses, sports eyeglasses and children's eyewear. On top of everything they come with a very high Abbe valve for clear and crispier vision.

Aspheric Lenses for Better Vision And Appearance

With aspheric eyeglass lenses,

Advanced optical design technology allows aspheric eyeglass lenses to be made with flatter curves than conventional lenses, giving them a slimmer, more attractive profile.

Conventional lenses have a front surface that is spherical, meaning it has the same curve across its entire surface, much like a baseball.

Aspheric lenses, on the other hand, have a more complex front surface that gradually changes in curvature from the center of the lens out to the edge.